Check the background of this financial professional on FINRA's BrokerCheck.
Catherine Scrivano, CRPC,CRC,CEP,ADPA,AIF
   

Newsletters


The E-Newsletter articles on this page provide valuable information on timely and interesting financial issues across a variety of subject areas, including retirement, investments, personal finance, annuities, insurance, taxes, college, and government benefits.


Mid-Year Planning: Tax Changes to Factor In
Investing to Save Time Boosts Happiness Returns
Marriage and Money: Taking a Team Approach to Retirement
What is the employment situation report, and why is it important to investors?
What is gross domestic product, and why is it important to investors?


SIGN UP NOW
Enter your name and e-mail to receive e-mail updates from me.
NAME:
E-MAIL:


 
 

Marriage and Money: Taking a Team Approach to Retirement

Now that it's fairly common for families to have two wage earners, many husbands and wives are accumulating assets in separate employer-sponsored retirement accounts. In 2018, the maximum employee contribution to a 401(k) or 403(b) plan is $18,500 ($24,500 for those age 50 and older), and employers often match contributions up to a set percentage of salary.

But even when most of a married couple's retirement assets reside in different accounts, it's still possible to craft a unified retirement strategy. To make it work, open communication and teamwork are especially important when it comes to saving and investing for retirement.

Retirement for two

Tax-deferred retirement accounts such as 401(k)s, 403(b)s, and IRAs can only be held in one person's name, although a spouse is typically listed as the beneficiary who would automatically inherit the account upon the original owner's death. Taxable investment accounts, on the other hand, may be held jointly.

Owning and managing separate portfolios allows each spouse to choose investments based on his or her individual risk tolerance. Some couples may prefer to maintain a high level of independence for this reason, especially if one spouse is more comfortable with market volatility than the other.

However, sharing plan information and coordinating investments might help some families build more wealth over time. For example, one spouse's workplace plan may offer a broader selection of investment options, or the offerings in one plan might be somewhat limited. With a joint strategy, both spouses agree on an appropriate asset allocation for their combined savings, and their contributions are invested in a way that takes advantage of each plan's strengths while avoiding any weaknesses.

Asset allocation is a method to help manage investment risk; it does not guarantee a profit or protect against loss.

Spousal IRA opportunity

It can be difficult for a stay-at-home parent who is taking time out of the workforce, or anyone who isn't an active participant in an employer-sponsored plan, to keep his or her retirement savings on track. Fortunately, a working spouse can contribute up to $5,500 to his or her own IRA and up to $5,500 more to a spouse's IRA (in 2018), as long as the couple's combined income exceeds both contributions and they file a joint tax return. An additional $1,000 catch-up contribution can be made for each spouse who is age 50 or older. All other IRA eligibility rules must be met.

Contributing to the IRA of a nonworking spouse offers married couples a chance to double up on retirement savings and might also provide a larger tax deduction than contributing to a single IRA. For married couples filing jointly, the ability to deduct contributions to the IRA of an active participant in an employer-sponsored plan is phased out if their modified adjusted gross income (MAGI) is between $101,000 and $121,000 (in 2018). There are higher phaseout limits when the contribution is being made to the IRA of a nonparticipating spouse: MAGI between $189,000 and $199,000 (in 2018).

Thus, some participants in workplace plans who earn too much to deduct an IRA contribution for themselves may be able to make a deductible IRA contribution to the account of a nonparticipating spouse. You can make IRA contributions for the 2018 tax year up until April 15, 2019.

Withdrawals from tax-deferred retirement plans are taxed as ordinary income and may be subject to a 10% federal income tax penalty if withdrawn prior to age 59½, with certain exceptions as outlined by the IRS.

Open communication and teamwork are especially important when it comes to saving and investing for retirement.

 
©2018 Broadridge Investor Communication Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved.
Connect with us on: Go to LinkedIn  Go to Facebook  
 
 
 
To learn more about the professional history of our financial advisor(s), please visit FINRA's BrokerCheck
Registered Representatives offering securities and investment advisory services offered through Cetera Advisor Networks LLC, member FINRA/SIPC. Cetera Advisor Networks and CASCO Financial Group are not affiliated. CASCO Financial Group nor Cetera Advisor Networks LLC offer tax or legal advice; please consult a qualified professional for advice.

The information being provided is strictly as a courtesy. When you link to any of the websites provided here, you are leaving this website. We make no representation as to the completeness or accuracy of information provided at these websites. Nor is the company liable for any direct or indirect technical or system issues or any consequences arising out of your access to or your use of third-party technologies, websites, information and programs made available through this website. When you access one of these websites, you are leaving our website and assume total responsibility and risk for your use of the websites you are linking to.

Registered to sell securities in the following states:
AZ, CA, CO, FL, GA, ID, IL, KY, MI, OR, SC, TN, TX, WA, WI

Online Privacy Policy
Important Disclosures
Privacy Promise
Order Routing Disclosure
 


Check the background of this financial professional on FINRA's BrokerCheck.